White River Restoration Projects

A landmark project that builds partnerships to benefit fish and industry.

"We welcome this cooperative effort to restore salmon habitat and reduce flood risks because it will use innovative designs that foster the dynamics of a large healthy river." - Jeremy James, Chair, Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Fish Commission

“Our job is to protect fish, habitat and the environment for future generations. The Tribe is happy to be part of long-term, collaborative solutions that benefit us all.” --Bill Sterud, chairman of Puyallup Tribal Council

A REGIONAL DISCUSSION

In the center of the vibrant Puget Sound region, one stretch of the White River through Sumner poses challenges for wildlife, for infrastructure and for the regional economy. In 2014, the State of Washington invested $824,000 for Sumner to lead a dialogue group regarding a small stretch of the river.

It became a full comprehensive plan of four companion projects for the full stretch of the White through Sumner.

DECADES OF CONTROVERSY

The White River’s flow sparked a 100-year-old fight that involved two counties, a lawsuit and even dynamite. The river now flows against its natural course through Sumner. At the time, dredging and Mud Mountain Dam offered protection against flooding.

Times have changed.

LASTING SEDIMENT

Sediment and debris continue to wash down Mt. Rainier from the headwaters into Sumner, posing hazards for endangered species and high risk of flooding during even normal rainstorms.

COMPREHENSIVE SOLUTIONS

Stewart Road Bridge $30,000,000: Replacement bridge is higher & wider, allowing river to migrate, improving vehicular traffic flow and connecting regional trail system.

Left-Bank Setback $25,733,000: Restores 20 acres off floodplain/riparian habitat to create room to hold floodwaters and ESA salmon habitat.

Pacific Point Bar $20,730,000: Acquires 10 properties to restore 25 acres of floodplain and add levee to protect our regional job center.

24th Street Setback Levee $38,317,000: Restore 170 acres of former golf course (owned by City of Sumner) creating side-channels and wetlands as large storage area for floodwaters plus additional habitat for ESA salmon.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Confirmed Funding: City of Sumner, Pierce Co Flood Control Zone District and Floodplains by Design
Assessed Value of Properties Currently Threatened by Flooding: $1.14 billion (not counting equipment, inventory or proprietary technology housed inside facilities)

POWER OF "AND"

In this scenario, everyone wins: salmon and other species get improved habitat; the region gets flood protection, shoring up the local economy; a regional trail system gets connected and transportation infrastructure improves.

Protect Pierce County’s largest manufacturing center--14,000 jobs in aerospace, production and distribution--from devastating floods.

Enhance habitat for endangered species, including salmon, and supporting the overall health of Puget Sound.

A landmark project that builds partnerships to benefit fish and industry.

"We welcome this cooperative effort to restore salmon habitat and reduce flood risks because it will use innovative designs that foster the dynamics of a large healthy river." - Jeremy James, Chair, Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Fish Commission

“Our job is to protect fish, habitat and the environment for future generations. The Tribe is happy to be part of long-term, collaborative solutions that benefit us all.” --Bill Sterud, chairman of Puyallup Tribal Council

A REGIONAL DISCUSSION

In the center of the vibrant Puget Sound region, one stretch of the White River through Sumner poses challenges for wildlife, for infrastructure and for the regional economy. In 2014, the State of Washington invested $824,000 for Sumner to lead a dialogue group regarding a small stretch of the river.

It became a full comprehensive plan of four companion projects for the full stretch of the White through Sumner.

DECADES OF CONTROVERSY

The White River’s flow sparked a 100-year-old fight that involved two counties, a lawsuit and even dynamite. The river now flows against its natural course through Sumner. At the time, dredging and Mud Mountain Dam offered protection against flooding.

Times have changed.

LASTING SEDIMENT

Sediment and debris continue to wash down Mt. Rainier from the headwaters into Sumner, posing hazards for endangered species and high risk of flooding during even normal rainstorms.

COMPREHENSIVE SOLUTIONS

Stewart Road Bridge $30,000,000: Replacement bridge is higher & wider, allowing river to migrate, improving vehicular traffic flow and connecting regional trail system.

Left-Bank Setback $25,733,000: Restores 20 acres off floodplain/riparian habitat to create room to hold floodwaters and ESA salmon habitat.

Pacific Point Bar $20,730,000: Acquires 10 properties to restore 25 acres of floodplain and add levee to protect our regional job center.

24th Street Setback Levee $38,317,000: Restore 170 acres of former golf course (owned by City of Sumner) creating side-channels and wetlands as large storage area for floodwaters plus additional habitat for ESA salmon.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Confirmed Funding: City of Sumner, Pierce Co Flood Control Zone District and Floodplains by Design
Assessed Value of Properties Currently Threatened by Flooding: $1.14 billion (not counting equipment, inventory or proprietary technology housed inside facilities)

POWER OF "AND"

In this scenario, everyone wins: salmon and other species get improved habitat; the region gets flood protection, shoring up the local economy; a regional trail system gets connected and transportation infrastructure improves.

Protect Pierce County’s largest manufacturing center--14,000 jobs in aerospace, production and distribution--from devastating floods.

Enhance habitat for endangered species, including salmon, and supporting the overall health of Puget Sound.